Yoga for Runners – Hips Don’t Lie

Originally this article in appeared on the PROBAR blog.  You can find it in its entirety here.

Runners’ bodies often need a special practice that’s tailored to complement their main sport. Yoga for runners needs to take into account not just the muscles that promote the movement but also the reciprocal muscle groups, in order to maintain a balance in the body.

Reciprocal inhibition is the process that our body uses for movement: one set of muscles contracts while the opposing set relaxes to create smooth movement. For example in when you are running as you lift your leg to propel yourself forward, your quadriceps must contract to lift the knee forward, and the hamstrings must relax. When the muscles are balanced they have the right combination of inhibition and facilitation during movement. When the inhibition and facilitation are not in the right combination, muscle imbalances may occur, leading to inefficiencies at best, and injuries at worst.

Many runners often step on their mat looking for relief for tight and achy iliotibial (IT) bands that are giving them trouble. I see people collapse into Pigeon Pose with blissful expressions on their faces. The stretch feels good. But more often than not there are no lasting results. You may even find that the stretched muscle group is tighter the next day.

In my experience with teaching yoga, running, and learning from my own injuries, the key to Yoga for Runners is reciprocal stretching and strengthening. It is critical to stretch both muscles groups in the reciprocal pair. So if you spend some quality time in Pigeon Pose to stretch the outer hip, your next stop should be Frog Pose, to show you adductors the same kind of love!


Nari PigeonPIGEON POSE:

  • Start on all fours and bring the right knee forward to touch your right wrist.
  • Inch the right leg forward until the right foot is just below the left hip.
  • Lengthen the left leg parallel to the long edges of the mat.
  • Softly lower the pelvis to the floor. If your left hip ends up higher than the right, tuck a block or a blanket under the right side to level the hips.
  • Walk your hands forward as you lengthen the torso on the inhale. Exhale as you fold forward over the right leg.
  • You can have either your forearms or hands on the mat, which will support more of your weight. If there is more space in the hip, you may want to lower your torso all the way to the mat.

Nari FrogFROG POSE:

  • Start on all fours and bring the knees farther apart, as wide as sustainable over a minute or two, as you hold the stretch.
  • Keep the hips directly over the knees. Bring the shins to form a 90 degree angle with thighs, and the feet to form a 90 degree angle with the shins. Flex the feet.
  • You can have either your forearms or hands on the mat, which will support more of your weight. If there is more space in your adductors, you may want to lower your torso all the way to a bolster or to the mat.
  • On an inhale lengthen the spine and engage the core just enough to prevent the low back from arching.
  • Pad the knees with a blanket if needed.

TIPS:

  • Use deep, unforced yogic breath to relax and soften into the stretch. This helps prevent pushing past your limit and resulting in microtears in the muscles being stretched.
  • If you feel a spasm in the opposite muscle group, this is due to the extra flexion work the reciprocal muscle has to go in order to stretch out a tight muscle group. If this occurs, gently back out of the stretch for a few seconds before returning to it.
Advertisements

Happy Hips for Running Happy

One of my biggest blessings and pleasures in life is teaching Yoga for Runners.  I have immense passion and love for the sport, and utmost respect for everyone who runs.  But I also know how much running can beat up someone’s body, and how much wear and tear runners suffer.  I myself have been through a series of injuries that were physically debilitating, completely deflated my spirit, and left me sidelined for months.  So my goal as a teacher is to help my runners find their ease of movement both on the mat and on the road.

Many runners complain of tight achy hips and want big stretches.  What often ends up happening is that their hips feel even tighter the day after.  In my experience, this tightness is often caused by imbalances in the hip girdle and/or weakness in the glutes.

My approach is to correct the imbalances on the mat by stretching opposite muscle groups equally: if you do Pigeon pose to stretch the tensor latae fasciae and the illiotibial band (outer hip) you should balance it with Frog pose to stretch the opposing adductor muscle group (inner thigh).

Strengthening the hip girdle sometimes can be as easy as a quick dynamic warm-up and activating the right muscle groups before you head out for your run.  I use a quick Myrtle routine before all my runs, which incorporates both strengthening and mobility we need for happy running.

Movement is Life

Nari Kripalu Dancer PoseMy whole body has ached since my injury nearly 6 weeks ago. A tiny, invisible, undetectable thing, this stress fracture, has completely upended my life: it has changed my daily habits and eating preferences; it has made me anxious and irritable, unable to burn off the excess energy; and has made me question the essence of my own being (can I still qualify myself a runner and a yogi if I cannot do either of these activities?). Every day I wake up ready to lace up and got for a run. Every day my body feels like a prison. And the inactivity makes the pain all the worse.

But then 2 weeks ago I went to Kripalu on a yoga retreat for my birthday. Even though I had always been more inclined to practice more vigorous and energetic styles of yoga, I was starting to dabble in Yin and Restorative practices, since that was what my achy body had been calling for. So when we got there, and I saw plenty of Restorative classes being offered, I knew, I was in for a treat.

Here I was, after weeks of being trapped in my own body, waking up on my mat at 6:30 in the morning. And then returning to the mat after breakfast again at 9:30. Then there was dance with live drumming. As the beat flowed right through me and resonated inside me, I couldn’t help but move. More a shuffle than a dance, but my soul was jubilant: I was discovering that there still were ways in which my body could move pain-free. I dabbled in some kayaking, some hiking (my doctor would potentially disapprove), and all the yoga I could cram into 2 already full days.

However different from my usual practice, it was really my time on the mat that made me feel at home in my body again. It gave me the awareness of when to move and when to back off so as not to hinder the healing process. It allowed me to begin addressing all the imbalances that contributed to the stress fracture in the first place. It helped me find a pain-free space for my body, where both my body and mind could find peace.

Since that weekend at Kripalu my doctor has cleared me for non-impact cardio, and even though I still cannot run, I am back at it swimming, spinning, and lifting weights to strengthen my body. But most importantly, I am back on my mat: still gingerly and cautiously, but I am flowing, and it makes the energy flow. Yoga returned me to movement again, and movement is essentially life.